Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances

**NOTICE TO ALL OWNERS OF A SOLID FUEL BURNING APPLIANCE OR FIREPLACE**

Guided by its desire to offer a healthy environment and quality of life to its citizens, the city council adopted, on December 7, 2020, by-law 814-1 on solid fuel appliances and fireplaces.

Burning firewood is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and can have harmful effects on health. Protecting the environment and air quality is a collective responsibility, and it is with a view to pursuing its strategic initiatives aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions on its territory that the city has made changes to the regulations governing solid fuel burning appliances.

Before using a solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace or undertaking installation or renovation work, be sure to know the regulations in force.

 

What is a solid fuel burning appliance?

Solid fuel burning appliances are stoves, inserts or factory-built fireplaces designed to burn logs of wood or other solid materials such as manufactured firelogs, coal or pellets.

A gas fireplace or electric fireplace is not a solid fuel burning appliance.

 

Rules concerning the use of solid fuel burning appliances and fireplaces

It is prohibited to use a solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace that is not EPA or CAN/CSA- B415.1 certified and that does not meet the maximum particulate matter emission rate of 4.1 g/h, except for homeowners with a grandfathered right until 2025.

It is also prohibited to use any solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace (whether it is compliant or not) when an Environment Canada smog warning is in effect for some or all of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

These restrictions do not apply during power outages affecting the residence for more than 3 hours.

Refer to By-law no.814

 

Existing appliances grandfathered until 2025

If you own a solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace with a particulate matter emission rate that exceeds 4.1 g/h, you must declare it to the City of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue before June 8, 2021 in order to benefit from a grandfathered right to use the appliance until September 1, 2025.

Homeowners who do not declare their appliances by June 8, 2021 may be subject to fines and will not be entitled to the grandfathered right. The City may therefore require the homeowner to stop using their device before 2025. After this date, any appliance will have to comply with the regultations in force.

For more information, please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions section at the bottom of this page or contact the Urban Planning Department at 514-457-5720 or permis@sadb.qc.ca


Refer to By-law 814 

Declaration Form

 

Mandatory declaration of a solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace

All owners of a solid fuel burning appliance or fireplace in the territory of the City of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, even if this appliance was installed a long time ago, must complete a declaration form and submit it to the City.

The deadline for completing the mandatory declaration is June 8, 2021.

The City of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue thus wishes to create a register of all solid fuel burning appliances on its territory in order to have a better portrait of the situation for future decisions and in order to be able to communicate better with owners in the event of regulatory changes.


Declaration form ->

Frequently Asked Questions ->

 

Installing or replacing solid fuel burning appliances or fireplaces

New or replacement solid fuel burning appliances or fireplaces installed inside buildings must be EPA-certified and emit 2.5 g/h or less of fine particles into the air. You must obtain a permit before proceeding with the work.


Refer to By-law 534 – Section 3.10

Permit Application Forms (see Renovation permit)

 

Outdoor fireplaces

Outdoor fireplaces, covered or otherwise, are prohibited throughout the Agglomeration of Montreal. In addition, any outdoor burning of wood, paper, waste, leaves, garbage, electrical wires or other material is prohibited in Sainte- Anne-de-Bellevue.


Refer to By-law 770 – Section 5.5

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

A: Yes. We ask all owners of fireplaces or solid combustion appliances, without exception, to complete the declaration form.

A: The City of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue wishes to create a register of all solid fuel burning appliances and fireplaces on its territory in order to have a better picture of the situation for future decisions and in order to be able to communicate better with owners in the event of regulatory changes.

A: A homeowner who fails to declare his/her appliance or fireplace before June 8, 2021 is liable to penalties and will not benefit from grandfathered rights if the appliance does not meet the emission standard equal to or less than 4.1 g/h of fine particles in the air. The City could therefore ask him to stop using his device before 2025.

A: Most units have an EPA certification label located at the back. If the emission rate does not appear on the label, check the owner’s manual or contact the supplier. As a reference, in May 2015 the EPA requirement for all manufactured appliances was set to 4.5 g/h or less of fine particle emissions. Therefore, fireplaces or appliances installed prior to this date probably do not meet this standard. (Note: The City of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue requires the emission rate to be 4.1 g/h or less, and not 4.5 g/h or less).

A: After September 1, 2025, all non-compliant solid fuel burning appliances or fireplaces must be replaced with one that meets the current standard. Non-compliant appliances that are not replaced can only be used during power outages affecting the residence for more than 3 hours.

A: EPA stands for Environmental Protection Agency. It is the US agency responsible for setting environmental standards for the United States.

A: Solid fuel burning appliances are stoves, inserts or factory-built fireplaces designed to burn logs of wood or other solid materials such as manufactured firelogs or coal. 
A gas fireplace or electric fireplace is not a solid fuel appliance.

A: Burning firewood is a significant source of fine particulate emissions in the Montreal area (39%), immediately following transportation (45%). Wood heating is a leading cause of winter smog.
In addition to negatively impacting the environment and air quality, the emissions from wood burning are harmful for health, contributing to asthma, childhood bronchitis, lung cancer, premature death in people suffering from chronic heart or respiratory diseases, etc.